4 talking about this. A Tribute to James Jamerson and His Lost Funk Machine .
The bass James Jamerson used in L.A. was a mid 60's P-Bass.

James Jamerson & the Legend of the Funk Machine. The Funk Machine. It's been missing for 30 years. This particular bass is accounted for: James Jamerson Bass Sold at Auction There are several other posts regarding The Funk Machine if you search Talkbass. James Lee Jamerson (January 29, 1936 – August 2, 1983) was an American bass player.He was the uncredited bassist on most of the Motown Records hits in the 1960s and early 1970s (Motown did not list session musician credits on their releases until 1971), and is now regarded as one of the most influential bass players in modern music history. His Fender P bass disappeared before his death in 1983. One of his children, James Jamerson, Jr. grew up to be an in-demand studio bassist, scoring a hit with his group Chanson, "Don't Hold Back" (number eight R&B, number 21 pop, fall 1978).

Allan Slutsky said it was a '62 in his book and this has become the accepted canon even though … Plucky The Bassist ZOMG! Ok so everyone knows the story, a few days before James Jamerson died, his 62 Precision 'The Funk Machine' that was used on so many classic records was stolen but does anyone know any more?

Yup probably lifted, pawned, and bought by someone who had no …


It's been missing for 30 years.

Jamerson’s first electric bass was a 1957 Fender Precision that was given to him by Chili Ruth.

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Jr. was the expert on the actual history of The Funk Machine, knowing first hand every detail and nuance regarding his dad’s missing bass guitar. I'm back from the dead! I have asked Bob Babbitt about this and he told me he believes the Funk Machine was stolen in Detroit before James came to California. 2,748 likes. Jul 30, 2010 Houston, TX. Jamerson and the mystery of the Funk Machine’s whereabouts are getting the spotlight in a new documentary entitled “James Jamerson & the Legend of the Funk Machine.” Filmmakers Paul Crutcher and Tom Neal are not only out to spread the gospel of Jamerson, but they’re on the hunt to find his treasured instrument. James Jamerson...the heartbeat of Motown. The story has always meant an awful lot to me for reasons I can't really explain. I am concerned that any chances of recovering the Funk Machine, James Jamerson's legendary bass that was stolen shortly before his death in 1983, may be thwarted by a bit of misinformation that is still very prevalent: the idea that this instrument was a 1962 Fender Precision Bass. Dec 30, 2019 #20.

James Jamerson...the heartbeat of Motown.

2,748 likes. He and hundreds of fans wanted to know what ever happened to James Jamerson’s stolen bass guitar known as The Funk Machine. James Jamerson...the heartbeat of Motown.

He carved the word “FUNK” into the bottom of the instrument and filled it with blue ink, hence it was called The Funk Machine. James Lee Jamerson (January 29, 1936 – August 2, 1983) was an American bass player.He was the uncredited bassist on most of the Motown Records hits in the 1960s and early 1970s (Motown did not list session musician credits on their releases until 1971), and is now regarded as one of the most influential bass players in modern music history.

The Funk Machine was a 1962 P-Bass.

Sadly, Jr. passed away in 2016 from health complications. His Fender P bass disappeared before his death in 1983. His Fender P bass disappeared before his death in 1983.

The famous P-Bass in this photo is one of many P-Basses that Jamerson owned.

His Fender P bass disappeared before his death in 1983.